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Ian Robertson-Salt’s Prismatic Paintings Explore Working Class Climate Anxiety

Ian Robertson-Salt’s Prismatic Paintings Explore Working Class Climate Anxiety

It’s easy to complain about the morning commute to work, but we often overlook the road it took to get us there in the first place. In his latest series, Nine to Five, Ian Robertson-Salt, who also goes by the pseudonym Anthroe, explores the relationship between society and the natural environment through the eyes of LA’s working class.

“Growing up in Los Angeles, I was exposed to many different cultures, ideologies, and socio-economic issues that have fueled my creative exploration,” Robertson-Salt explains. “The exploration of contemporary issues surrounding sustainability, poverty, intimacy, history, and identity are the driving forces of my practice.”

Though his prismatic work can be found splashed across southern California in the form of large-scale murals, Robertson-Salt’s traditional paintings deal with the small, mundane moments we neglect in favor of flashy gestures and Instagram activism. Nine to Five is rife with “small” moments worth considering: the woman sudsing her cups in Wash Rinse Repeat might wonder how much water she’ll ration for dishes 20 years from now; the work-from-home employee in Energy Saver might close his laptop, warily eyeing the net-zero transmissions clock set to expire in 2050.

Ultimately sympathetic, Robertson-Salt’s working-class vision is peppered with uprooted flowers, encouraging “viewers to question the significance of their own interactions with nature and life in the urban environment."

“The exploration of contemporary issues surrounding sustainability, poverty, intimacy, history, and identity are the driving forces of my practice.” — Ian Robertson-Salt

Nine to Five

Painter Ian Robertson-Salt explores the relationship between society and the natural environment through the eyes of LA’s working class.
‘Check Engine Light’
Painter Ian Robertson-Salt explores the relationship between society and the natural environment through the eyes of LA’s working class.
‘Energy Saver’
Painter Ian Robertson-Salt explores the relationship between society and the natural environment through the eyes of LA’s working class.
‘Follow the Leader’
Painter Ian Robertson-Salt explores the relationship between society and the natural environment through the eyes of LA’s working class.
‘Wash Rinse Repeat’
‘Morning Joe’
‘Hung Out’
‘Rhythm & Brooms’
‘Waiting’

Ian Robertson-Salt: Website | Instagram | Purchase Work

All photos published with permission of the artist.

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Morgan  Laurens 

Morgan Laurens is an arts writer who lives in the Midwest and enjoys saying "excuse me" when no actual pardon is needed. She is the founder of So Long See You Tomorrow, an organization that helps artists and creative entrepreneurs write about their work, craft a story, and get back in the studio. Learn more at: https://solongseeyoutomorrow.com

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