fbpx
‘New Celebrities’: Jared Hendler Documents the Rise of the Influencer cover

‘New Celebrities’: Jared Hendler Documents the Rise of the Influencer

With Twitter in free fall and the Meta money-hole looming over Mark Zuckerberg’s head, stories about the negative impact of social media are all over the news these days. Depression, anxiety, doomscrolling, and data harvesting are just a few of the side effects users experience on apps like TikTok, Instagram, and Facebook. In short, there’s plenty to be pessimistic about.

South African-born artist Jared Hendler sees a silver lining in the dark clouds hovering over these apps. Now based in Los Angeles, Jared documents the rise of the influencer, exploring how marginalized voices connect with a wider audience through acts of vulnerability. “The underlying human need to connect with others on an intimate level requires us to publicly expose a part of ourselves not often seen,” he writes in his artist statement.

Appropriated directly from social media, Jared Hendler’s gestural oil portraits explore the ways marginalized voices connect with a wider audience.
‘2018 was ok I guess’

Appropriated directly from social media, Jared’s gestural oil paintings capture the personality and essence of each influencer with alarming insight. His work documents “our obsession with creating our own identities,” a phenomenon that continues to broaden as oppressed communities find new outlets for self-expression. “Many marginalized communities previously unrecognized or misrepresented by mainstream media now have a direct and powerful voice,” says Jared.

Working in advertising throughout the ‘90s, Jared quickly recognized that seismic shifts in technology were changing long-cemented power structures. Individuals living outside the confines of social mores and cultural norms suddenly had a powerful voice, a tool that allowed for authenticity, vulnerability, and connection like never before.

“No one’s doing portraits of these people,” Jared says in an interview with Muse by Clio, a platform exploring creativity in advertising. Abandoning tired portraiture tropes, Jared finds himself untethered to royals and blue bloods with too much money and cultural clout. His work seeks a new paradigm, one that reflects contemporary attitudes about identity. “The emergence of a ‘new’ celebrity for a new era is what I bring to life in my work,” he says. “A reflection and archive of who we are now.”

“Many marginalized communities previously unrecognized or misrepresented by mainstream media now have a direct and powerful voice.” — Jared Hendler

Appropriated directly from social media, Jared Hendler’s gestural oil portraits explore the ways marginalized voices connect with a wider audience.
‘@deedsweaves’
Appropriated directly from social media, Jared Hendler’s gestural oil portraits explore the ways marginalized voices connect with a wider audience.
‘Beauty Campaign’
Appropriated directly from social media, Jared Hendler’s gestural oil portraits explore the ways marginalized voices connect with a wider audience.
‘Everyone likes puppies’
‘Extra. Extra. Be all about it!!!’
‘#covergurls’
‘La Femmina Basquiat’
‘Hair it is’
‘On the other side of shame’
‘Skirt Day’
‘Slay Now, Loading’
‘WiN oR DiE’
Jared Hendler uses oil and charcoal to document the rise of the influencer on social media.

Jared Hendler: Website | Instagram

All photos published with permission of the artist(s).

Want to be featured on NOT REAL ART? Email editor@notrealart.com with a short introduction and a link to your online portfolio or three images of your work.

Morgan  Laurens 

Morgan Laurens is an arts writer who lives in the Midwest and enjoys saying "excuse me" when no actual pardon is needed. She is the founder of So Long See You Tomorrow, an organization that helps artists and creative entrepreneurs write about their work, craft a story, and get back in the studio. Learn more at: https://solongseeyoutomorrow.com

>
0 Shares
Email
Tweet
Share
Pin
Share
Flip
Buffer
WhatsApp