fbpx
Michelle Garcia Dismantles the Empty Ideals of Racism and Social Hierarchy cover

Michelle Garcia Dismantles the Empty Ideals of Racism and Social Hierarchy

“I particularly like drawing people,’’ says Michelle Garcia, whose breezy illustrations reflect growing anxieties surrounding race, immigration, and civil rights in America. Working with clients like The New York Times, ProPublica, and the Vera Institute of Justice, Michelle creates mixed-media paintings that center the value of human life within their narratives.

“As a first generation American, I've had a lot of difficult experiences,” the Latina artist tells NOT REAL ART. “Although some of these experiences have been painful, I'm grateful for everything that has happened because it has made me the person I am […] I'm interested in centering people like that in my work.”

While some of Michelle’s editorial assignments veer into bagels, BBQ, and one particularly nauseating Jell-O mold, the underlying emotion powering even her most lighthearted works is compassion. “I’ve built my art practice around the idea that people do not have to be passive participants in an unjust racial system, but can create a racial reality in which everyone belongs,” she says.

Based in LA, Michelle Garcia creates breezy illustrations that reflect growing anxieties surrounding race, immigration, and civil rights in America.
‘Unsafe Release’

Michelle’s philosophy on justice comes to fruition in her Unsafe Release series, a trio of heartbreaking works created for the Vera Institute of Justice. Tucked into the accompanying text, Michelle’s paintings illustrate the cruel fate waiting for disabled immigrants at the US-Mexico border. “There is no consistent policy or practice for the release of people who the government has deemed unable to advocate for themselves from immigration detention,” writes author Erica Bryant in her article “ICE’s Deadly Practice of Abandoning Immigrants with Disabilities and Mental Illnesses on the Street.”

Michelle’s three contributing works cleverly evoke alienation, social isolation, and estrangement from community: an absurd bureaucratic maze; a man abandoned in the cold without his medication; a sea of suffering faces. Rendered in bright reds, blues, and purples, Michelle’s work makes room for joy and hope within the unjust systems that prick so many tears. She notes: “I strongly believe that racist ideals, laws, social hierarchies, and traditions cannot flourish when people resist them and deconstruct them as empty ideas.”

“I’ve built my art practice around the idea that people do not have to be passive participants in an unjust racial system, but can create a racial reality in which everyone belongs.” — Michelle Garcia

Based in LA, Michelle Garcia creates breezy illustrations that reflect growing anxieties surrounding race, immigration, and civil rights in America.
‘Unsafe Release (Maze)’
Based in LA, Michelle Garcia creates breezy illustrations that reflect growing anxieties surrounding race, immigration, and civil rights in America.
‘Unsafe Release (Group)’
Based in LA, Michelle Garcia creates breezy illustrations that reflect growing anxieties surrounding race, immigration, and civil rights in America.
‘Men Painting Pool, 1966’
‘Ripe for Reflection and Expression’
‘Aspic Gentrification’
‘How Magnet Schools
‘Three for Ten’
‘Forgotten and Suffering’

Michelle Garcia: Website | Instagram | Purchase Work

All photos published with permission of the artist(s).

Want to be featured on NOT REAL ART? Email editor@notrealart.com with a short introduction and a link to your online portfolio or three images of your work.

Morgan  Laurens 

Morgan Laurens is an arts writer who lives in the Midwest and enjoys saying "excuse me" when no actual pardon is needed. She is the founder of So Long See You Tomorrow, an organization that helps artists and creative entrepreneurs write about their work, craft a story, and get back in the studio. Learn more at: https://solongseeyoutomorrow.com

>
0 Shares
Email
Tweet
Share
Pin
Share
Flip
Buffer
WhatsApp